Wineries and Travel

Wineries and Travel

  1. Texas Wine Country

    Texas Wine Country

    ell someone you went to Texas Wine Country and invaribly you will hear "I didn't know Texas produced wine!" The wine industry in Texas began in the mid-1970s and is flourishing very well today. Here's some more history and an overview on Texas wines. Read more...
  2. Understanding California Wines

    Understanding California Wines

    Are you confused by the ever-increasing number of new California labels on wine lists these days? If so, join the club. With more than 250 wineries in both Napa and Sonoma alone, there are endless choices for a restaurant wine buyer. Read more...
  3. Australian Wine Regions

    Australian Wine Regions

    Despite its relatively short history, Australia has demonstrated that it is a worthy wine country to be reckoned with. Its wine, especially the Shiraz, has achieved worldwide recognition and they are continuously producing better and more wines each year. Read more...
  4. Beginners Guide to French Wine Classificaton

    Beginners Guide to French Wine Classificaton

    In France, as each wine region is different in terms of climate, soils, topography, slope, elevation, exposure and sunlight, each should have its own grape varieties and wine styles. Read more...
  5. Napa & Sonoma Wineries & Dining

    Napa & Sonoma Wineries & Dining

    Although nearly every part of California is now planted in vines, the two leading areas remain Sonoma and Napa. Found out about the history, wineries, tours and the best places to eat in this article. Read more...
  6. The New Zealand Wine Region

    The New Zealand Wine Region

    The development of the New Zealand wine industry has focused on refining cultivation techniques and progressive vineyard experimentation, culminating in today's determination to produce wines distinguished among the world's finest vintages. Read more...
  7. The Oregon Wine Region

    The Oregon Wine Region

    In the mid-1960s when the first vineyards of Pinot Noir were planted in the Willamette Valley, there were virtually no wineries producing vinifera wines in the Pacific Northwest states of Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Read more...